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COVID-19 TESTING & VACCINE

We offer Covid-19 testing. Call our office to schedule an appointment.
We also offer Covid-19 vaccines, as supplies become available in accordance to state-wide rollout.

 

Covid-19 Testing and Vaccination

The following information has been provided by the United States Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is the national public health agency of the United States.

What is Covid-19?

COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. Because it is a new virus, scientists are learning more each day. Although most people who have COVID-19 have mild symptoms, COVID-19 can also cause severe illness and even death. Some groups, including older adults and people who have certain underlying medical conditions, are at increased risk of severe illness.

How does Covid-19 spread?

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person to person, including between people who are physically near each other (within about 6 feet). For example, when a person coughs or sneezes and microscopic droplets from the cough or sneeze travel through the air. People who are infected but do not show symptoms can also spread the virus to others. Cases of reinfection with COVID-19  have been reported but are rare. We are still learning about how the virus spreads and the severity of illness it causes.
 

COVID-19 spreads very easily from person to person. How easily a virus spreads from person to person can vary. The virus that causes COVID-19 appears to spread more efficiently than influenza but not as efficiently as measles, which is among the most contagious viruses known to affect people.

What are symptoms of Covid-19?

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills

  • Cough

  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

  • Fatigue

  • Muscle or body aches

  • Headache

  • New loss of taste or smell

  • Sore throat

  • Congestion or runny nose

  • Nausea or vomiting

  • Diarrhea
     

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19.

 

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately by calling 911.

 

  • Trouble breathing

  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

  • New confusion

  • Inability to wake or stay awake

  • Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone
     

What is the difference between Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19?

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2), and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses.
 

COVID-19 seems to spread more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms and people can be contagious for longer. More information about differences between flu and COVID-19 is available in the different sections below.

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.

What are the types of Covid-19 tests?

COVID-19 tests are available that can test for current infection or past infection. The types of tests are:

  • viral test tells you if you have a current infection. Two types of viral tests can be used: nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) and antigen tests.

  • An antibody test (also known as a serology test) might tell you if you had a past infection. Antibody tests should not be used to diagnose a current infection.


Who should get tested for Covid-19?

  • People who have symptoms of COVID-19.

  • Most people who have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.

  • People who have tested positive for COVID-19 within the past 3 months and recovered do not need to get tested following an exposure as long as they do not develop new symptoms.

  • People who have taken part in activities that put them at higher risk for COVID-19 because they cannot physically distance as needed to avoid exposure, such as travel, attending large social or mass gatherings, or being in crowded or poorly-ventilated indoor settings.

  • People who have been asked or referred to get tested by their healthcare provider, or state, tribal, local external icon, or territorial health department.

  • CDC recommends that anyone with any signs or symptoms of COVID-19 get tested, regardless of vaccination status or prior infection. If you get tested because you have symptoms or were potentially exposed to the virus, you should stay away from others pending test results

Can children get Covid-19?

Children can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and can get sick with COVID-19. Most children with COVID-19 have mild symptoms or they may have no symptoms at all (“asymptomatic”). Fewer children have been sick with COVID-19 compared to adults. However, children with certain underlying medical conditions and infants (less than 1 year old) might be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Some children have developed a rare but serious disease that is linked to COVID-19 called multi-system inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C).

What are the Covid-19 vaccines?

Currently, there are three Covid-19 vaccines that have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA is responsible for protecting the public's health by ensuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, and the safety of our nation's food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. Source: FDA.  The three Covid-19 vaccines that have met FDA approval are:
 

 

  • Pfizer-BioNTech (2 doses)

  • Moderna (2 doses)

  • Johnson & Johnson's Janssen (single dose)


Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine will also help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccination is an important tool to help us get back to normal. The COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. It typically takes two weeks after vaccination for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus that causes COVID-19. That means it is possible a person could still get COVID-19 before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection. 

 

People are considered fully protected two weeks after their second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, or two weeks after the single-dose Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. After you are fully vaccinated, you may be able to start doing some things you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. Learn more about what you can do when you have been fully vaccinated.

Although COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting sick, scientists are still learning how well vaccines prevent you from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to others, even if you do not have symptoms. People are encouraged to keep practicing social distancing, wearing a mask, and washing hands (or using hand sanitizer) after being vaccinated.

For more information, visit the Centers for Disease and Prevention website at: https://www.cdc.gov/

Reference to specific commercial products, manufacturers, companies, or trademarks does not constitute its endorsement or recommendation by the U.S. Government, Department of Health and Human Services, or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;